Winter spinach gone to seed

Americauna rooster strutting amongst the spinach

Truth be told, the whole winter gardening thing didn’t really go anywhere for us this year. There are so many reasons why this didn’t happen, which I will detail in a future post, but for now I would like to note our one small success: spinach.

It’s barely early June here and we already have about a dozen spinach plants which have gone to seed as they’ve been producing lovely leaves for us for many weeks since kicking into action late in the winter (after a fall planting in our greenhouse). Today was the day I pulled them out of the ground, and our little flock of Americaunas could not have been happier.

Americauna hens pecking at spinach leaves

I realize that I haven’t shared a lot of pictures of our chickens, who are rather pretty.

Chickens and spinach leaves

The roosters crack me up with their incessant posturing, and they are rather handsome these Americaunas. So I had to laugh when I caught this fellow from this angle.

Americauna rooster bending down

He knew he was under scrutiny and immediately swung round to express his displeasure.

Americauna rooster

And then, there is Esme, the nurturing mother of this now fully grown flock.

Americauna hen with spinach

10 thoughts on “Winter spinach gone to seed

  1. We have been wildly unsuccessful with growing spinach. But kale is another story. It grows easily all winter and provides blossoms for the bees in spring. It’s a super food with cancer preventing qualities. I wrote a short blog about it last year including a dynamite recipe for my favorite soup.
    http://solarbeez.com/2012/05/08/kale-flowers/
    I haven’t found the trick in growing spinach yet so let me know when you discover it…meanwhile, I’ll stick to kale. 🙂

    1. Oh yes, your bees must love all that kale! I tend to grow stupid amounts of kale as well and only more recently made room in our garden for chard and spinach. I’m not sure I have any specific tips to share with the spinach; I’ve had success with both the non-conventional types (eg Malabar) and conventional ones. I’ll be sure to check out your post!

  2. Kale just grows all by itself here – thanks to my “plan” to let it self-seed. I pull up the odd plant for the chickens who devour it, but there’s still plenty left to self-seed that bed.

    I love your birds, such lovely colours. You already know that I think roosters have plenty of character :).

    1. I think that leaving the kale in to do its thing sounds so sensible. I’ve been accustomed to rotating beds and haven’t tried that with kale (knowing too, how harsh our winters are). Oh yes, the roosters sure do keep things interesting! 🙂

  3. Your chickens are gorgeous!! We did a similar thing a couple of months ago, when my hairdresser’s husband cleaned out his spinach bed. He saved it all for me, and when we dumped the 2 garbage bags of spinach into the run, my girls thought al their dreams had come true!

    1. Thank you! What a thoughtful hairdresser. Your girls must have been absolutely over the moon when their spinach showed up! I know that ours seem so grateful and happy whenever they get a bit of apple or veg from the garden. It does a heart good to watch them!

  4. Gorgeous plump chooks with beautiful feathers! The boss chook is hilarious. I love chickens, having grown up with them myself, but unfortunately our ‘yard’ (and I use that term loosely) is too small to accommodate them. Thankfully our boys new school has ten chickens roaming around, so they can get some chicken love during school hours!

    1. Thanks Saskia, I do think they are rather splendid looking. And the boss (whom Petkid calls Glossy) is definitely one who ‘knows it’! Your boys are so fortunate to have chickens at school, how fantastic is that.

    1. Thanks Kate. Our big mistake was not getting organized soon enough in the season and planting what we did too late. And then I started homeschooling, and it all unravelled from there. We’re planning to make homeschooling work to our advantage this year, making the winter garden research and set-up part of the curriculum. 🙂

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